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Bonus Points!

So I started talking to my immigration attorney today concerning my upcoming application for permanent residency in Canada. In the conversation I asked him about the status of our new child, who will be born in February. He told me that the new child will be Canadian, and may have dual citizenship (have to check with the US on that one). And - we will receive "5 bonus points" on our PR application for having a "relative in Canada".

:)

Comments

( 10 comments — Leave a comment )
spiritdance
Aug. 4th, 2005 12:11 am (UTC)
Cool! :-)
allisona
Aug. 4th, 2005 12:15 am (UTC)
A relative in Canada :). Hee hee, that's great.
braider
Aug. 4th, 2005 01:24 am (UTC)
Child of an American citizen is automatically an American. I don't know if you can do dual citizenship with US/Canada, but usually the kid doesn't have to choose one or the other until the age of 18.
bardiclug
Aug. 4th, 2005 03:59 am (UTC)
Yes you are right. And my child will also be Canadian. It's a crazy mixed up world we live in. ;)
almeda
Aug. 5th, 2005 09:16 am (UTC)
And as of several years before my hubby (born in Toronto to parents born in, respectively, London and Texas) hit 18, you don't actually have to renounce one. The US used to go all meanie and make you pick whether you WERE or WERE NOT American. Now the law is that, as far as the US govt is concerned, and as long as you haven't formally renounced, you're American. No being all dual and then trying to claim, "Hey! Hey! Foreign national!!" whenever it's convenient.
pondside
Aug. 4th, 2005 02:38 am (UTC)
Since 1992 there's no problem with having dual US Canadian Citizenship. The US ignores your Canadian Citizenship and Canada ignores your US Citizenship.

We did the immi dance, first internal then external for a couple of years due to D's medical condition. You pay your money, do NOT smile for the camera and wait and wait.

The relative in Canada is a nice touch. Pity you don't get 10 points for twins...
bardiclug
Aug. 4th, 2005 04:00 am (UTC)
Yeah, that's the story we are getting. You are considered a citizen of the country you are in at the time. So, "dual citizenship", but not in the classic sense. It means I don't have to give up my US Citizenship if I choose to apply for Canadian citizenship.
pondside
Aug. 4th, 2005 04:49 am (UTC)
Absolutely correct -- but it also means that even though after the first year of residence you may not need to pay US taxes -- you will be remitting a tax return to the US for the rest of your natural born days (if you want to remain a US Citizen -- any anything else would be "a bad idea")

We have the name of a good US/Canadian tax accountant on the mainland that we use...
bardiclug
Aug. 4th, 2005 02:40 pm (UTC)
I'm going to need to get the name of your accountant one of these days. :)

The question I still haven't gotten answered yet is whether my new child will require a Canadian AND US Passport? Just Canadian? Just US? Since the Grandparents are in the US, we will have to travel relatively soon after the birth, and I want to have this figured out ahead of time. :)
almeda
Aug. 5th, 2005 09:19 am (UTC)
The US will want them to enter the US on a US passport, and Canada will want a Canadian passport to enter. You can leave either country on any passport you want. You can enter other countries using either passport, so far as I know, since all third-party countries consider the two citizenships equal.

My husband's a triple (with Britain), so he finds having a British passport useful -- can we say, EU privileges?
( 10 comments — Leave a comment )

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